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Helpful Guides

Helpful Guides


How Can I Reduce The Amount Of Spam I Receive?

Try not to display your email address in public. That includes newsgroup postings, chat rooms, websites or in an online service's membership directory.
You may want to opt out of member directories for your online services; spammers may use them to harvest addresses.

Check the privacy policy when you submit your address to a website. See if it allows the company to sell your address. You may want to opt out of this provision, if possible, or not submit your address at all to websites that won't protect it. Read and understand the entire form before you transmit personal information through a website. Some websites allow you to opt out of receiving email from their "partners" - but you may have to uncheck a preselected box if you want to opt out.

Decide if you want to use two email addresses - one for personal messages and one for newsgroups and chat rooms. You also might consider using a disposable email address service that creates a separate email address that forwards to your permanent account. If one of the disposable addresses begins to receive spam, you can shut it off without affecting your permanent address.

Disposable E-mail Services:
-http://www.spamgourmet.com
-http://www.spamex.com

Use a unique email address. Your choice of email addresses may affect the amount of spam you receive. Spammers use "dictionary attacks" to sort through possible name combinations at large ISPs or email services, hoping to find a valid address. Thus, a common name such as jdoe may get more spam than a more unique name like jc88823doe. Of course, there is a downside - it's harder to remember an unusual email address. Use an email filter.

Check your email account to see if it provides a tool to filter out potential spam or a way to channel spam into a bulk email folder. You might want to consider these options when you're choosing which Internet Service Provider (ISP) to use.


What Can I Do With The Spam In My In-Box?

Report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Send a copy of unwanted or deceptive messages to uce@ftc.gov. The FTC uses the unsolicited emails stored in this database to pursue law enforcement actions against people who send deceptive spam email.
Let the FTC know if a "remove me" request is not honored. If you want to complain about a removal link that doesn't work or not being able to unsubscribe from a list, you can fill out the FTC's online complaint form at http://www.ftc.gov. Your complaint will be added to the FTC's Consumer Sentinel database and made available to hundreds of law enforcement and consumer protection agencies.
Whenever you complain about spam, it's important to include the full email header. The information in the header makes it possible for consumer protection agencies to follow up on your complaint.

Complain to the sender's ISP. Most ISPs want to cut off spammers who abuse their system. Again, make sure to include a copy of the message and header information and state that you're complaining about spam.

Firefox
Spam Blockers

The most popular alternative web browser on the internet.
http://www.firefox.com

Although DirectLink has spam blocking on all of our email accounts we recognize that some customers may want to use more sophisticated tools. There are a couple of free programs that are very very effective. They can be "trained" to recognize spam.